The Seven Sorrows of Mary, March 27, 2022

The Seven Sorrows of Mary
March 27, 2022     5pm

Rosary
JT Anglin, organist

The First Sorrow
“The Prophecy of Simeon” -Luke 2:34-35
Then Simeon blessed them and said to his mother Mary, “This child is destined for the falling and the rising of many in Israel, and to be a sign that will be opposed so that the inner thoughts of many will be revealed—and a sword will pierce your own soul too.”
“Ave Maria” by Bach/Gouron performed by Conner Galle, tenor

The Second Sorrow
“The Flight into Egypt” -Matthew 2:13-21
Now after they had left, an angel of the Lord appeared to Joseph in a dream and said, “Get up, take the child and his mother, and flee to Egypt, and remain there until I tell you; for Herod is about to search for the child, to destroy him.” Then Joseph[a] got up, took the child and his mother by night, and went to Egypt, and remained there until the death of Herod. This was to fulfill what had been spoken by the Lord through the prophet, “Out of Egypt I have called my son.”

When Herod saw that he had been tricked by the wise men,[b] he was infuriated, and he sent and killed all the children in and around Bethlehem who were two years old or under, according to the time that he had learned from the wise men. Then was fulfilled what had been spoken through the prophet Jeremiah:

 

“A voice was heard in Ramah,

    wailing and loud lamentation,

Rachel weeping for her children;

    she refused to be consoled, because they are no more.”

 

When Herod died, an angel of the Lord suddenly appeared in a dream to Joseph in Egypt and said, “Get up, take the child and his mother, and go to the land of Israel, for those who were seeking the child’s life are dead.” Then Joseph[d] got up, took the child and his mother, and went to the land of Israel.
“Ave Maria” by Caccini performed by JT Anglin, tenor

The Third Sorrow
“The Loss of the Jesus Child in Jerusalem” -Luke 2:41-50
Now every year his parents went to Jerusalem for the festival of the Passover. And when he was twelve years old, they went up as usual for the festival. When the festival was ended and they started to return, the boy Jesus stayed behind in Jerusalem, but his parents did not know it. Assuming that he was in the group of travelers, they went a day’s journey. Then they started to look for him among their relatives and friends. When they did not find him, they returned to Jerusalem to search for him. After three days they found him in the temple, sitting among the teachers, listening to them and asking them questions. And all who heard him were amazed at his understanding and his answers. When his parents[a] saw him they were astonished; and his mother said to him, “Child, why have you treated us like this? Look, your father and I have been searching for you in great anxiety.” He said to them, “Why were you searching for me? Did you not know that I must be in my Father’s house?”[b] But they did not understand what he said to them.
“Ave Maria” by Cherubini performed by Annika Lunde, soprano

The Fourth Sorrow
“Mary meets Jesus on the Way to Calvary” -John 19:17
and carrying the cross by himself, he went out to what is called The Place of the Skull, which in Hebrew[a] is called Golgotha.
“Ave Maria” by Shubert performed by Annika Lunde, soprano

The Fifth Sorrow
“Jesus Dies on the Cross” -John 19:18-30
There they crucified him, and with him two others, one on either side, with Jesus between them. Pilate also had an inscription written and put on the cross. It read, “Jesus of Nazareth,[a] the King of the Jews.” Many of the Jews read this inscription, because the place where Jesus was crucified was near the city; and it was written in Hebrew,[b] in Latin, and in Greek. Then the chief priests of the Jews said to Pilate, “Do not write, ‘The King of the Jews,’ but, ‘This man said, I am King of the Jews.’” Pilate answered, “What I have written I have written.” When the soldiers had crucified Jesus, they took his clothes and divided them into four parts, one for each soldier. They also took his tunic; now the tunic was seamless, woven in one piece from the top. So they said to one another, “Let us not tear it, but cast lots for it to see who will get it.” This was to fulfill what the scripture says,

“They divided my clothes among themselves,
    and for my clothing they cast lots.”
And that is what the soldiers did.

Meanwhile, standing near the cross of Jesus were his mother, and his mother’s sister, Mary the wife of Clopas, and Mary Magdalene. When Jesus saw his mother and the disciple whom he loved standing beside her, he said to his mother, “Woman, here is your son.” Then he said to the disciple, “Here is your mother.” And from that hour the disciple took her into his own home.

After this, when Jesus knew that all was now finished, he said (in order to fulfill the scripture), “I am thirsty.” A jar full of sour wine was standing there. So they put a sponge full of the wine on a branch of hyssop and held it to his mouth. When Jesus had received the wine, he said, “It is finished.” Then he bowed his head and gave up his spirit.
“Ave Maria” by Saint Saëns performed by Lawrence Galle, tenor

The Sixth Sorrow
“Mary holds the lifeless body of Christ in her arms” -John 19:39-40
Nicodemus, who had at first come to Jesus by night, also came, bringing a mixture of myrrh and aloes, weighing about a hundred pounds. They took the body of Jesus and wrapped it with the spices in linen cloths, according to the burial custom of the Jews.
“Ave Maria” by Donizetti performed by Tor Lunde, bass & Connor Galle, tenor

The Seventh Sorrow
“Jesus is laid in the tomb” -John 19:40-42
They took the body of Jesus and wrapped it with the spices in linen cloths, according to the burial custom of the Jews. Now there was a garden in the place where he was crucified, and in the garden there was a new tomb in which no one had ever been laid. And so, because it was the Jewish day of Preparation, and the tomb was nearby, they laid Jesus there.
“Ave Maria” Gregorian Chant performed by JT Anglin, tenor

5 minute Meditation then Choir leaves in Silence








Augustine
First Archbishop of Canterbury, 605
RCL:  2 Corinthians 5:17–21, Psalm 66:1–8, Luke 5:1–11

Collect:
O Lord our God, who by your Son Jesus Christ called your servant Augustine to preach the Gospel to the English people: We pray that all whom you call and send may do your will, bide your time, and see your glory; through the same Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen

Once there was a boy called Augustine. He grew up living in a monastery in Rome, Italy. When he was old enough, he became a Benedictine monk and planned to live a life of prayer, church work and quiet contemplation.

But Pope Gregory had other plans for Augustine. In the year 595, Pope Gregory chose Augustine for a special role; to bring the Catholic Church to England. Now, Augustine had to leave his life of comfort and take on a dangerous mission to an unknown land.

He set off with a group of 40 other missionaries on horseback, along with books, relics and a few clothes. It was long and perilous journey of 844 miles. On the way, Augustine heard many stories of how terrible England was and how uncivilized the people were. The weary travelers were so afraid that when they reached France, they were too scared to go on. Augustine decided to turn back and return to Rome.

But Pope Gregory wrote letters to Augustine, encouraging him to be brave and carry on and reach England because the people needed him.

Eventually, in the Spring of 597, the group arrived on the shores of the isle of Thanet. They were greeted by Ethelbert of Kent and Queen Bertha, personally, who welcomed them. They invited Augustine to the capital city, Canterbury and said he could establish his church there. Ethelbert told Augustine he was free to convert as many people as he could persuade to the truth of the Gospel.

The king gave him a little church building called St. Martin’s and so Augustine began preaching and teaching the local people. Augustine was successful and he sent news back to Pope Gregory in Rome about how well it was going.

One day, to his surprise, Augustine was overjoyed that Ethelbert asked him to baptize him in the Christian faith. And once the king converted, many of his people too wanted to become Christians. And so on Christmas Day in 597, 10,000 people were baptized as followers of Jesus.   

This news reached Rome and Pope Gregory made Augustine the first Archbishop of Canterbury, leader of the new Catholic church in England, in communion with the Bishop of Rome.

Augustine stayed in England and became a wise and clever Bishop. He never returned to Rome and died in 604.

He sowed the seeds of Christianity in the British Isles and became known as ‘the Apostle of England.’ His bravery and commitment as a missionary disciple of Jesus is a shining example to us all to spread the good news wherever we go.

 

[from St. Augustine Academy website]

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